Trisomy 18: The Range of Possibilities

sunset_birds_clouds_213977          for Nora, who gives us hope.

One of the difficult things about trisomy 18 is the range of possibilities. How can a mother prepare for her baby’s birth when it might be born still or live for a few months? How do you prepare for the labor? Is it time to get a nursery ready? How do you nest? I struggled a lot with this range during the pregnancy and when my daughter, Mary Rose, died an hour after birth, I felt unprepared. That was it? Where were our tender, special moments? How could it be over so quickly after so much anticipation and such a long pregnancy? I know that I am one of the lucky ones. Though my daughter was barely breathing I looked into her eyes and saw that they were blue.

When I wrote grants for a living I depended on data to help me build my case for my projects. I am no stranger to research and data and I know what to do with the numbers when I get them. However, the numbers for trisomy 18 baffled me. The doctors give you a brochure that lists a number of defects that would frighten any pregnant women. The brochure says 92-95% of babies born with trisomy 18 die before their first birthday. The medical establishment says that trisomy 18 is incompatible with life. I wanted to know about that 5-8% who live.

Trisomy 18 is an illness with multiple defects. The child’s brain is severely disabled. In the pictures that I have seen the infant opens one eye, the jaw is slack, the fingers are in a different position, the chin is shorter, the feet are longer, the head is bigger, the ears are deformed. I read all of these defects and worried that my child would be so deformed that I would have a negative reaction to her. I wondered how I would handle my daughter’s illness if she lived. How would I manage my family’s needs when I live far from my extended family? What would the impact be on my young son? I mentioned my fear to the genetic counselor toward the end of my pregnancy and told her that I was concerned that Mary Rose would live and suffer. I mentioned mosaicism and she blurted out: “Your baby has the full-trisomy 18.” I had agonized for months over this, but was never given this information that was apparent from the genetic testing.

I looked and looked for stories, for answers. Who lived? Why? I found a blog about a boy on life support who was three. I found a few other cases of children who were alive and young. Except for very rare exceptions these kids were on life support and had undergone multiple surgeries and hospitalizations to deal with their defects such as heart and other organ defects. They breathed through a trach and were fed through machines. A couple of the children had mosaic trisomy which means that the programming of all the cells are not carrying the trisomy 18 gene. Children with the mosaic illness function at a higher level and often can breathe on their own and even eat.

According to my online searches most of the 5-8% of babies with trisomy 18 who live appear to be on life support. I read about these children in newspaper articles and on blogs. The data seem skewed. For parents who choose not to be on life support, what are the numbers? For parents who choose life support, what are the numbers? I asked doctors what would happen after my daughter’s birth and was told repeatedly “We don’t know. We have to wait and see how strong she is when she is born.” However, in the publication Care of the Infant and Child with Trisomy 18 or Trisomy 13: A care book for families, I read that “5-8% of these infants live past their first birthday without extraordinary measures. And, once a child’s age is greater than a year there is a 60% chance to live beyond age 5 years.” It is estimated that there are 200 people in the United States alive and older than one years old with trisomy 18.

It is important to note here the big controversy surrounding the term “incompatible with life.” People are trying to get this term removed from the description of trisomy 18. I know that very few of these children live, and that they need doctors who will treat them (often doctors don’t want to treat babies with trisomy 18 or 13), but most of these babies do not have the programming in their bodies to thrive. In addition to the defects and disabilities, the children have incredibly weak muscle tone. This is why Mary Rose’s jaw was slack, why her limbs were splayed in all directions when I held her in my arms. This is the reason that most of these babies cannot eat or eat enough. Their sucking motion is too weak if they can suck at all. As a mother of a daughter with trisomy 18 who died, the illness seems incompatible with life, and even though some live, most of these babies die. This is not to say that babies who live don’t deserve to be treated by doctors in the most ethical way. I spoke to a neonatal cardiologist to see about heart surgery for Mary Rose and he did not recommend surgery. He said that if she could live long-term after the surgery, he would be willing to do it, but the heart he said, is only one defect of many. He also informed us that most of the babies who undergo heart surgery in Mary Rose’s condition never come off the trach. Was he being unethical? This is a man of faith who spoke honestly. We never got to the point where surgery was an option but my husband and I decided that we probably would not opt for surgery. We didn’t want to cause any suffering for our unborn daughter.

This week I was very touched by the comments and emails and replies I got to my chapter “Homebirth and the Fatal ‘Diagnosis’” that I posted on my blog last week. One woman reached out to me to tell me of her homebirth in 2000. Her daughter, Nora, was born at home with full trisomy 18 and this is rare. I made the assumption that Nora was gone like all the other babies I know with this illness. Nora’s mother shared her story with me. Her daughter lives at 15 without life support. I found some photos of her family on Facebook. Nora looks like an angel. Her eyes exude the deepest peace. I am so blessed to know her, to add her story to this work. Nora’s story is rare. So how do we prepare for the different outcomes?

A baby was born this week at under four pounds with trisomy 18 and she lives. The baby, Grace Miriam, had three diagnoses and lived for six weeks. Mary Rose slipped away peacefully after birth. Others are born still. How are we to know what will happen? When dealing with trisomy 18, as with all other things in life we can only stay in the moment and breathe. As we all know, some moments change our lives forever. The accident, the diagnosis, the illness comes one moment and nothing is the same. This happens when we give birth. It happens when we hear news we don’t want to know on an ultrasound. And it happens with trisomy 18. But our lives also change suddenly when we meet someone who lights up our soul, are offered a new job, hold a positive pregnancy test in our hand, and sometimes even when we witness a sunset dotted with birds migrating south for the winter. I am open to this continuously changing Universe and I lift up my heart and pray one more time that whatever comes today is for the highest good of all.

Please follow and like us:
Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://www.diannavagianos.com/blog/trisomy-18-the-range-of-possibilities/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *